Dirty Debt Secrets, Part 2- Conquering Debt

In Part 1 of Dirty Debt Secrets I shared my personal story of how I got in over my head with credit card debt. It’s never something we consciously set out to do, but without proper monitoring and having a budget in place it can easily get out of hand. Before we know it we’re drowning our sorrows in a bottle of wine on the couch wondering how we could have been so careless. I am very much still in the process of my debt payoff, but have noticed what key things helped me make some major progress. So put the bottle of wine down and log into your account because it’s time to tackle that outstanding balance! Yea it sucks, but you know what’s worse? Not doing anything about it.

How I’ve Been Conquering My Debt Payoff

Read this book, no seriously read it.

If you’re facing debt issues, both big and small, then Dave Ramsey’s “The Total Money Makeover” is a must-read for you. In this book he offers no-nonsense advice and strategies for how to manage and pay down your debt. Best of all, it’s packed full of success stories from people in WAY worse situations than you, so you can feel a little bit better about yourself along the way. One of my favorite strategies of his is the Snowball Method, which is especially effective when your debt is coming from a few different places and not just one source. Instead of tackling all outstanding debt sources equally, or focusing on the one with the highest interest rate first, Dave recommends putting your most efforts into the smallest amount of debt first. Pay that off, then move onto the next smallest, adding the amount of $ you were paying on first one now to the next source of debt. By starting with the lowest amount of debt first and working your way up it allows you to have mini wins along the way. Obviously keep paying ALL of your debt bills each month, but really focus in and pay in as MUCH as you can to that one with the smallest balance. I used this method since my non-student loan debt was located in a few different places and it really helped me to stay motivated. Nothing feels better than seeing that $0 outstanding balance, it only hypes you up to put as much as you can toward the next source so you can get that next win. Since starting the Snowball Method I completely paid off two different sources of debt, and I’m telling you, it’s addictive. I am now down to my one last area of non-student loan debt, and in the last 6 months have paid off 70% of it. It is actually exciting now to drop a few hundred $$ after a paycheck onto my credit card and see that balance jump down more and more.

Start Saying No and Decrease Your Social Spending

Remember in Part 1 when I mentioned how no one likes to be the cheap friend, the one who has to say no? Well it’s time for you to embrace your frugalness and the word no! If you want to make REAL progress in paying off your debt then you won’t be able to do all the things your friends do, wear the latest fashion trends, or drive a nice new car-  and you need to start being comfortable with that. Each time you stay in instead of going out, just order 1 drink instead of 4, or turn down an invite to a concert, that’s more money in your pocket to put towards getting rid of that debt. If your friends are true friends they will fully understand and support you. If they don’t understand and still pressure you then they suck. Kidding, but not really kidding. When I was still living in Atlanta one of my close friends and I loved just chilling on the couch on a Saturday night with a bottle of wine together. WAY cheaper than going out, we didn’t have to spend money on uber, and we got to be in our PJs.

Pretty much any night where you can get drunk with good company in your PJs and barely spend money is a fantastic night as you get older.

Decreasing my social spending also became a lot easier when I came back from Europe and was no longer living in the city. I was living with Stephen, about 35 min outside of Atlanta, and our days were usually made up of work, cooking at home and just spending time together. I would still get into town, see friends and have a social life- but it was less frequent and a hell of a lot easier to spend less when I wasn’t living so close to all the fun. I could no longer just uber from home for a night out, which meant I had to drive, which also meant I had to limit the amount of drinks I ordered. All of those factors together made saving money on social spending a much more doable task for me.

Reevaluate Your Rent Choices

A huge influence on the success of my debt payoff came from giving up my apartment and no longer living on my own. Rent and all the bills that came with it were my biggest monthly expense followed by my student loan payments. Rent is usually most people’s biggest monthly payment, and if there is anything you can do to decrease it then definitely consider it. I had already gotten rid of all my furniture and 70% of my ‘stuff’ before traveling overseas, so when I returned it made staying with Stephen an easy transition for both of us. Stephen teases me now because when we first started dating I said I was NOT going to live with a boyfriend, it’s even more funny now that I live across the world with him. But in the long run it made sense to break one of my ‘rules’ in exchange for a long term financial advantage. I am not saying everyone should go move in together, seriously don’t even consider it if you can’t see this person as a lifelong partner, but sharing the burden of living expenses can help a lot so you can put more money towards debt. Another option is living with a family member, even if it’s just for 6 months or a year, so you can make those bigger payments. After Stephen moved back to Australia I lived with my mom for a few months until my move so I was able to continue with the higher debt payments. I couldn’t believe I was living with my mom again at almost 30 years old, even if it was only temporary. But sometimes you need to swallow your pride and get creative with options for cutting large costs. The year I spent not having my own place saved me over $12,000 which I was able to use elsewhere. Not too shabby. If these are not doable options for you then look at how to still decrease your living expenses- ditch the cable and just rock the Netflix, move a little bit out of town or get a smaller place where rent is cheaper, get a roommate instead of living by yourself. There are always ways to cut costs, you just have to be a little creative and get outside your comfort zone. It’ll be worth it in the long run.

 

Having an understanding and super supportive partner.

I could not have asked for a better support system than my boyfriend Stephen. I remember before I opened up about my debt situation with him, I felt like it was this major baggage I was embarrassed to ever mention. Have you seen the episode of ‘How I Met Your Mother’ where Lily doesn’t want to tell Marshall about all the CC debt she’s been hiding? Yep, that’s how I felt. I thought exposing this secret about myself would be a total turn off. I’m sure no one WANTS to date someone in debt (especially credit card debt), it’s way easier to be with someone with no money baggage. We talked about it a little, but later into our relationship we started to have open discussions about it- exactly how much it was and what to do about it. His influence, money outlook and support has been the #1 thing that’s helped me come this far. Stephen is the perfect example of someone living within their means. Like me, he didn’t have someone to pay for his education or support him during those young adult years, but the way he handles money is something I aspire to be like. I mean for crying out loud we’re talking about a guy who lived off of $1,200 total for 3 months while traveling around France and Spain surfing, living in his car. He doesn’t believe in spending money he doesn’t have, to the point where it’s slightly annoying sometimes. He does have credit cards now, but it is solely for gaining points to use for flight purchases and he only charges to the card if he has the money waiting in his checking/savings account. Definitely the way a credit card should be handled.

On a recent trip to Melbourne Stephen and I were talking about future vacations (I know right, talking about the next vacation while on vacation). He is also a travel addict and maintains a separate savings account just for traveling, because you know, he’s responsible and stuff. He said I should look at my budget and think about how much I could actually afford to set aside each month for future trips, no matter how small, so we could figure out finances together. I told him it really doesn’t make sense for me to put anything aside for traveling, at all, until my credit card debt was GONE. If in the next few months he wanted to go somewhere, he would just have to go alone. For me to say that was a huge step forward. He was really proud of me, and together we worked out a way for me to be 100% CC debt free by the end of 2017. The plan includes me completely cutting out ALL unnecessary spending- no shopping for the house, no buying clothes, getting my nails done, eating out, nothing until the debt was gone. All of my income right now is going toward regular bills (phone, student loans, health insurance, etc), setting aside just a tiny bit for necessities like gas, and then everything else goes towards the credit card. Seem pretty hardcore? Kind of, but the way I am looking at it is it’s short term pain for an amazing long term gain. Stephen is completely holding me accountable for this commitment, and having someone who knows my situation and who supports me without judging has been key for keeping me on track.

 

Get a Debt Gym Buddy

You know how they tell you having a gym buddy will make you go to the gym more often than if you were attempting to go all on your own? You have someone checking in, asking you to join them and holding you accountable. Make someone in your life your debt gym buddy. For me that person is Stephen for sure. Your partner is the perfect person to be your debt gym buddy since they are already such a big part of your life. If you haven’t already, open up to them about your situation and ask them to be there to cheer you on and support you when you’re feeling like giving up. If you’re living the single life consider confiding in a close friend or family member- let them know what you’re dealing with and that you want their support with making it happen. I also confided in a few close friends of mine when I decided to get really serious about my debt and it felt really good to be transparent. If you and your partner are both in similar debt situations, then you already have your debt gym buddy! Just make sure you are both staying accountable instead of going back down the rabbit hole together.

 

Get a Side Hustle

Side hustles have become a growing trend these days. So many people have them and it’s a fantastic way to earn extra cash when your salary is limited by one employer. All those years I was working full-time for one company I almost always had some sort of side hustle to increase my overall income. Over the years I’ve had side jobs for graphic design, social media, marketing-  I even went back to waiting tables at some point for a couple nights a week. It can get exhausting, commuting, working an 8 hour day, and then having to work more at night or on the weekends… but it’s worth it in the end. You can choose to either use that side income only for debt payoff, or use the extra money for your regular spending so you can put almost all your main income toward debt. I’ve kind of flip flopped over the years how I’ve structured it, usually in the past the extra income was used for traveling or something I didn’t actually need. My first international trip to Costa Rica with Under30Experiences was paid for by side projects. Since I left the 9-5 and started working for myself the side hustles and main income kind of all got mixed into one- my business. But I still have my main regular clients which support all of my living expenses, student loan payments and credit card payments. But now the little, not-so-regular projects are all going straight toward, you guessed it, the credit card!

 

Hitting $0 and Moving Forward

This coming New Years will be a milestone for me because it will be the first time in many years I’ll be starting a year with no credit card debt. That goal alone is what makes shutting down any little spending thoughts that creep into my head so much easier. I am dying to decorate my new home office, to get a few more lamps and pieces for the house, and OMG my nails look like sh!t and need a professional makeover. But it’s these small choices to say no and put my money elsewhere that is making it possible for me to be done with the CC debt at the end of this year. Once that balance hits zero and my next paycheck comes in you better believe I’ll be at the nail salon and buying some damn throw pillows. But after this year my debt journey is still not over unfortunately. Next up is the student loan debt, which I will tackle full force. Okay, so I probably won’t be quite as hardcore about cutting spending as I’ve been lately, but my goal is to double my monthly payments to speed things up. And when that day comes when I am completely, 100% debt free, O what an indescribable feeling it will be.

Top 5 Questions About My Eurotrip Answered

The time is finally here! I arrived in Barcelona, Spain early this morning and have spent my first day settling in and exploring this new beautiful city. It’s such a nice feeling to know I’ll be here for a few weeks, so instead of rushing into touristy things I can take my time and really get to know the city at my own pace. Since letting friends and family know about my plans to travel around Europe for a few months I’ve been approached with a lot of the same questions. Before I start posting all about my soon to be had experiences, I wanted to take the time to openly answer some of these questions. You never know, some of them could potentially help you take a similar leap in the future if your heart desires.

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#1- How can you afford to travel around Europe for 3 months, PLUS Australia and beyond?

Let me start by saying something that may make me look like a total crazy person. I am not traveling off of a savings account, or a lump sum I’ve been putting away. I knew if I were to wait until I had a big stash to travel off of it most likely wouldn’t happen. With what seems like never-ending student loan debt, plus other monthly obligations and debts that have compiled over the years, I could always find a place for that little extra money to go (plus a girl’s gotta have a few nights out here and there!). I’m sure most of us have experienced this… the cycle of excuses for why its just not the right time or we can’t afford it, and before we know it, it’s 5 years later. Since letting go of my apartment at the end of March, I am now traveling off of my monthly income, working remotely from my laptop, and using what used to be rent and utility money to pay for my lodging in each country. Plus  occasionally staying with friends in certain places to give myself a little break. Since I am staying in apartments and homes instead of a hotel or a hostel, the access to a kitchen means I don’t have to eat out every meal, which helps keep eating costs lower.  I LOVED having my own apartment and still miss it, but at the end of the day you can’t always have it all (actually you can pretty much never have it all so just get used to it), and right now I am choosing travel over having a home of my own. Now if I can just avoid the shopping then I should be in good shape 😉

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SauvignonBlue-Barcelona-4#2- What are you doing for work?

This past March I register my LLC and in April finalized my business bank account, making me an official business owner! My company is called Savvy Chic and I offer graphic design, marketing, social media maintenance and beyond to small-medium size companies. I have kept my past full-time employer on as a client which has helped with the transition, and have acquired a few other steady clients as well, so far solely through referrals. I may be in a completely different country from them working, but at the end of the day my clients come first, before any European fun. Because without them I wouldn’t be here today, checking my emails in a little cafe in Barcelona right by my apartment. The recent past has shown me if you work your ass off, are loyal and earn people’s trust, so many doors and possibilities could open for you.

Now let me just tell you, it’s freaking terrifying taking the leap to go on your own, especially being an independent, non-married woman. It’s much easier having that same paycheck come in every month, not having to worry and make things happen on your own all the time. But those safety jobs don’t always let you live in Spain, France, London, Amsterdam, Italy or Croatia now do they? Some may, but most office jobs don’t. Risky? Definitely. But big, crazy, exciting things like this don’t happen sitting in the same office 9-5.

 

#3- Where are you staying?

Out of the 3 months I will be here I will be staying on my own in airbnb’s most of  the time, with friends in London and Amsterdam for just a week each, and then with my boyfriend in an airbnb apartment we rented in Biarritz, France the week he comes to visit. I know a lot of people have stayed in hostels to save money, but since I am working this entire time and have expensive technology with me I really needed the personal space and security. There are so many options on airbnb as far as price points, locations, types of properties, and if you choose to stay in a room in someone’s place or rent the entire place to yourself. I am very happy with my decision to rent a room in a Colombian woman’s apartment for June. Since it is my first time in Europe all together I like the idea of starting off the trip with someone knowing if I come home each night. It makes me feel safer and not totally alone. Plus you really get to experience what it might be like to LIVE in a place like this. I’m sure you’ve seen all those airbnb commercials recently saying things like “don’t just GO to Paris, LIVE in Paris”. Might be slightly cheesy, but it’s true. It’s fun having my own keys to a old little 3 story walkup above a bakery. And don’t forget about the financial savings! My lodging with her for an entire month, in a wonderful area of Barcelona, was only $767… less than what I used to pay for rent in Atlanta, GA. Try getting that at a decent hotel anywhere.

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#4- How does your boyfriend feel about you leaving the country?

Have I said before that 2016 has been a crazy year? If someone were to have told me January 1st of this year that a few weeks later I’d be dating an amazing guy who is totally supportive of me traveling around the world, I would have told you you’re out of your mind. In fact, I think maybe 2 weeks before we met I wrote a blog post about being happily single… funny how that happens isn’t it?

Anyways, the conversation of me traveling abroad for an extended time came up early on in the relationship, and luckily he couldn’t be more supportive. After his years of living in London, traveling all around the globe, and since he isn’t even from the US to begin with (yep I snagged an Aussie, hehe), he totally understands my uncontrollable wanderlust and desire to see the world. I don’t know many men who would want to continue pursuing seeing someone who after just a few weeks tells them they’re wanting to leave the country for months. I just happened to find one that did! Neither of us wanted to go the ENTIRE time without seeing each other, long distance is never easy, so he’s meeting me for a week long stay in France. I know he’s secretly hoping, well more like openly hoping, that after the 3 months in Europe I’ll trade in some solo travel for trips with him. I’m fine admitting I’m totally okay with that idea, and it’s already coming true with our trip back to Australia in September 🙂

 

#5- How are you packing for 3 months worth of travel?

Last but not least! I’ve been getting this question a lot recently leading up to my leave yesterday. Believe it or not I packed all clothes, shoes, and toiletries into a 45L  backpacking backpack, plus a messenger bag to hold my laptop and electronics. Obviously for over 3 months I’ll be doing laundry here and there as needed, but since my trip is open ended in a lot of ways I didn’t want to deal with lugging a huge rolling suitcase around some cobblestone streets, or wherever else the journey is going to take me. The mobility of a backpack when traveling by airplane, bus, train, and on-foot is completely worth the sacrifice of traveling with less overall, and I like the security of it being totally strapped to me. So far so good!

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I would love to answer any more questions you guys may have about the trip, about remote jobs, and/or about taking the leap to work for yourself! Feel free to comment below or email me at sauvignonblue@gmail.com. And don’t forget to check back soon to see how my first experience in Barcelona has been going, with plenty of pictures to go along with the story.